HP Shoving the 10 GE Forward

The best people to ask these days would be the network administrators. If you have noticed, there has been a lull in the continuous development of high end Ethernet solutions. We have seen the fast paced development which last saw Gbit Ethernet links rule. Since then, we have not heard anything to the latest transition towards the faster 10 Gbit Ethernet technology apparently due to the rising costs of raw materials, most of which are needed to make it all happen.

These days, it is not a secret that everything is going up. New copper cabling and components are getting pricey by the day and with that in mind, it is apparent that there will be hesitation on the part of most companies and networks to consider the high-end cabling solutions.

Data centers in particular, are turning to cost-effective networking solutions such as multiple Gbit Ethernet links that costs less than $200 per port. A 10GE link can cost as much as $2,500 per port as reported.

Hewlett Packard is not using this as a setback to their continuous development. Rather than step back, they are hoping that their move to release its first transceiver modules to carry their 10 Gbit Ethernet over multimodule optical fiber will help nudge the current market towards leaning to new technology. HP hopes its 10GBase-LRM modules help nudge the slow-moving market for 10GE forward.

In a world that is playing along the lines of risky business with consideration towards current economic trends, a pit stop of sorts has hindered the continuous development of the Ethernet solutions we should be enjoying. From what it stands, this push may not only be a move that will awaken the sleeping world of Ethernet and network solutions but can help us continue the network solutions we are all enjoying at the moment.

Comments:

19 responses so far ↓

1 Gravain // Aug 10, 2008 at 11:34 am

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Shoving maybe the right word here as the ethernet solution movement needs to be pushed along. Usually hindered by limited budget due to a slowing economy, HP is taking a big risk by doing this move. Kudos to them!
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2 Linc // Aug 10, 2008 at 11:37 am

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Actually, both supra and Yellow kitty have valid points, but I’m going with HP here. The one who wins is the one who risks it all. In the future, people are going to look at this HP moment when the 10 Gbit movement finally surges ahead.
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3 supra // Aug 10, 2008 at 11:39 am

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HP is going to fall flat on its face.

Timing is everything when you’re going to make a sale, and this is the worst time to get a product out there that’s too expensive to buy. Naturally management will go for the one that’s cheapest rather than something that’s as expensive as this is.
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4 Taorista // Aug 10, 2008 at 11:41 am

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The article mentions that most data centers are looking for ways to get more savings. No company wouldn’t want to get more bang for their buck. HP’s got some guts moving their transceiver modules at a time like this.
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5 Kitty Yellow // Aug 10, 2008 at 11:44 am

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@supra: please give these guys a chance, HP’s been around for so long, that I guess they know what they’re doing.

@topic: the 10 Gbit ethernet movement needs a spark and HP just might be the thing that creates the fire.
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6 Anestha // Aug 10, 2008 at 11:47 am

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Besides hardware, what about peopleware? Are people ready to accept this now or in the near future? Some people are still reeling from the XP to Vista transfer moreso about this.

Are admin IT personnel ready to tackle the problems that a 10 Gbps device will entail?
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7 Anestha // Aug 10, 2008 at 11:48 am

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I guess Taorista’ s right that with HP’s experience in business, they’ve already thought of a plan if their product flops.

I’m still a bit pessimistic though regarding their choice in putting their faith in 10 Gbps. I don’t think the major populance of IT network administrators are ready for this yet.
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8 fletch // Aug 10, 2008 at 11:49 am

It’s expensive and ill-timed. I’m not sure if companies right now can afford to buy something like this when the alternatives are doing well on their own. Probably once the US economy picks up, then maybe people will take a look at this.

9 fletch // Aug 10, 2008 at 11:49 am

I hope that nobody takes this as a negative comment regarding HP’s choice in timing, but the main issue here is their pushing the envelope for 10 Gbps usage. Sometimes, if you’re too fast forward you’re going to alienate a lot of people–this will include their target market.

10 Gravain // Aug 10, 2008 at 11:50 am

Like the recent post about Motorola, HP is gambling for higher stakes. Imagine if they pull this off, they’re going to be in pole position to take 10 Gbps technology to the next level.

11 Gravain // Aug 10, 2008 at 11:50 am

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I’ve always thought of HP as a company that sells good PCs and Printers, but never transceiver modules. They’re going out on a limb to be the first. Will they succeed or will they fail? I guess only time can tell.
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12 Linc // Aug 10, 2008 at 11:51 am

You have to remember as well that if a company shoves too much, the market pushes back: there might be a backlash in the making here. Remember when 3G was created in the early 2000? Nobody hardly noticed it because the technology wasn’t there yet. Now, it’s all the rage. Could this be the same thing as well?

13 supra // Aug 10, 2008 at 11:52 am

Looks like I’m not the only one who thinks this is a bad time for 10 Gbps technology to be placed in the market. Don’t get me wrong guys, I want 10 Gbps to be the standard, it’ll make my job a heck of a lot easier, but I think the timing should have been thought of before they rolled this out of the production line.

14 supra // Aug 10, 2008 at 11:52 am

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Last post, we had a cellphone company trying to be a Wifi network ethernet solutions provider, now we have a printer company trying to be the first one out there to push for the 10 Gbps movement. Why don’t they just stick to what they’re good at and go from there?
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15 Taorista // Aug 10, 2008 at 11:53 am

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That’s another we need to take a look at. Eventhough 10Gbps is already here, is the technology ready for it? Yes, HP is putting this ethernet solution out there, but could it become useless?

Again we are back to the timing of this device release.
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16 Taorista // Aug 10, 2008 at 11:53 am

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I would rather that a company such as HP has already thought this out and planned possible exit scenarios if this didn’t work. Still this ethernet solution will be handy in the near future, whether we all like it or not.
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17 Kitty Yellow // Aug 10, 2008 at 11:54 am

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I used to work for someone who said something along the lines like: It’s better to be first than the best.

If HP can move out there and be the first one to successfully implement the 10 Gbps movement, then they’ll be part of history, and they’ll also be the ones to sell the most first.
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18 Taorista // Sep 27, 2008 at 7:40 am

Sometimes shoving can lead to regurgitation or just plain vomiting. It’s better not to push the envelope when the surrounding structure of a project isn’t there yet.

If there’s none, I think it would be best to either wait until they come up or create it yourself. Being a pack leader always means more of everything: expenses, risks, and profit.

19 supra // Sep 28, 2008 at 6:28 pm

Push too little and you get nothing. It’s a tug of war between pushing new technology and remaining safe in the current one. HP’s foray into this market is very risky to say the least. I don’t agree with them going into another industry because it diverts resources the company could use for their main source of income.

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